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a nocturnal placental mammal.
artist aged 21 years nestled in florida, usa.


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fotojournalismus:

Day 19: Palestinian death toll passes 1,000 | July 26, 2014

Thousands of Gaza residents who fled the violence streamed back to devastated border areas during Saturday’s 12-hour humanitarian truce to find large-scale destruction: fighting pulverized scores of homes, wreckage blocked roads and power cables dangled in the streets. In northern Beit Hanoun, even the hospital was badly damaged by shelling. Across Gaza, more than 130 bodies were pulled from the rubble on Saturday, officials said. In southern Gaza, 20 members of an extended family were killed before the start of the lull when a tank shell hit a building where they had sought refuge. (Sources: 1, 2, 3)

Pictures from Beit Hanoun & Shejaiyah during a pause in the bombing by Israeli forces:

1. A general view of destruction in the Shejaia neighbourhood. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

2. Palestinians carry belongings they find at their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)

3. A Palestinian man looks staggered after seeing his home destroyed, while visiting the area during a 12-hour cease-fire in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

4. Palestinians inspect the damage of their destroyed houses in Shejaiyah neighbourhood. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

5. Palestinians recover the body of a man killed when his home was hit the previous night by Israeli fire in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

6. A mare and her foal walk along the debris of destroyed buildings in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

7. Palestinians survey the damage in Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

8. Children wait for their parents, who collect belongings from their destroyed houses in Beit Hanoun. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)

9. A general view of destroyed buildings after Israeli attacks in a part of the Shuja’iyya neighbourhood. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

10. Palestinian women react amid the destruction in the northern district of Beit Hanoun. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)

cross-connect:

Lorenzo Nanni born in Italy, is a 34 years old textile artist living and working in Paris. He specialized in embroidery.

 I use natural minerals and materials: felt, silks, cotton fabrics & threads, wools & fibers, glass and precious stones (Quartz, jade…). I use bones too, along with woods, metals and rhodoïds. It was spontaneous for me to choose these types of materials because my pieces are inspired by flora, fauna and anatomy. I have a lot of respect for nature and animals

On my production method, I always begin with a sketch. Then I move to pattern-construction, dying then assembling fibers and finally embroidery. The time of the process can vary from 10 days up to 9 months of work, depending on the objects. Some pieces require 100 hours of embroidering. They are all unique pieces.The use of fiber has never been lost; the textile has always accompanied the painting as a form of decorative art, and has undergone the changes of time and civilization; suffered the influence of shapes, volumes and materials.

via

cross-connect:

Steve Salo

When fire tore through Steve Salo’s studio in Torquay he was devastated. Inside the artist’s studio were approximately 70 of his paintings, and 80 drawings and sketchbooks, some of which he had treasured since a child. Every single one was destroyed. All of his art materials and tools were obliterated along with reference books and a cherished drawing case from his childhood. The blaze consumed everything, a lifetime of irreplaceable work reduced to ashes.

“I find it quite hard to talk about it now. The best thing for me is to put it behind me and not ponder over it,” Steve says, clearly still coming to terms with the emotional impact of the disaster that occurred nearly a year ago.

After the fire Steve says it felt like time stood still, “almost like a surreal dream”. He was overcome with confusion, disbelief and grief. For the next couple of months Steve had no desire to paint, unable to motivate himself to even pick up a paintbrush. Eventually, however, the urge to create returned and he began to paint, not with brushes but with his fingers. It was an important step in the healing process.

http://www.saatchiart.com/salo

(via saatchiart)